Minimally Invasive Surgery FAQs

What is videoscopy?

What kinds of procedures benefit from a videoscopic surgical option?

How does videoscopic surgery affect recovery time?

How are the outcomes vs. traditional surgical procedures?

What is GERD?

How is GERD treated?

How successful is the treatment for GERD?


What is videoscopy?

Videoscopic surgery allows physicians to see and work inside the body without making the large incisions required by traditional surgery. Instead, the surgeon uses small “ports” through which surgical instruments are passed. A videoscope – a tiny video camera connected to a television monitor – functions as a visual guide for the surgeon.

What kinds of procedures benefit from a videoscopic surgical option?

Center physicians perform a number of advanced gastrointestinal, oncological, gynecological and arthroscopic procedures and, in conscious pain mapping, use videoscopy as a highly accurate diagnostic tool.

How does videoscopic surgery affect recovery time?

Procedures using videoscopic surgery require shorter hospital stays, produce faster recovery periods and are more cost-effective than traditional surgery.

How are the outcomes vs. traditional surgical procedures?

Patients typically have a highly positive reaction to videoscopic surgery. They experience less pain and less scarring, and they are able to return to work and other normal activities in a much shorter time.

What is GERD?

For more than 9 million Americans, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic, painful and debilitating condition in which the stomach acids surge upwards from the stomach into the esophagus causing a harsh burning sensation. The condition occurs because the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) fails to close, allowing stomach acids to reflux back into the esophagus.

How is GERD treated?

Traditional treatment options include lifestyle changes and drug therapy. Because of advances in videoscopic surgery, the laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has become the standard surgical treatment of GERD. In the procedure, videoscopic techniques are used to construct a new LES by wrapping the upper portion of the stomach around the lowest point of the esophagus. The new LES prevents reflux of stomach acids into the lower esophagus.

How successful is the treatment for GERD?

Studies have shown that more than 90% of patients who undergo the procedure are symptom-free after ten years. The traditional procedure required a hospital stay of up to ten days and a recuperation period of six weeks or more. With laparoscopy, the hospital stay is usually two or three days and most patients return to work within a week following the surgery.

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