Friday, February 23, 2018

UPDATE – Friday, February 23, 2018 (6:30 p.m.)

MIDDLETOWN

At 4 p.m. today, Middlesex Hospital began providing emergency care to walk-in patients. The Hospital opened a temporary Emergency Department space in its outpatient surgical services area.

It is still not receiving patients via ambulance, and the Hospital’s normal Emergency Department
location in Middletown is still closed until further notice.

Patients who visit the Hospital’s temporary Emergency Department space should drive to the main
entrance of the Hospital. At that point, a security officer will be there to greet them. The officer will
then direct them to where they need to go.

If someone is sick or injured and needs immediate attention, they should call 9-1-1. An ambulance will bring them to the next nearest emergency department. Middlesex’s other Emergency Department locations in Westbrook and Marlborough are open.

Non-emergent surgeries are canceled for today, Friday, February 23.

Radiology is up and running at the Hospital. However, all outpatient radiology tests are canceled at the Hospital in Middletown today, Friday, February 23.

Patients can get lab tests at the Outpatient Center, 534 Saybrook Road in Middletown; at the Marlborough Medical Center in Marlborough; or at the Shoreline Medical Center in Westbrook. However, they should not come to the Hospital.

Patients are now allowed to receive visitors. Flu restrictions remain in place.

All other Middlesex Health System locations are operating as normal.

Allergens: Pollen

Allergens: Pollen

What is pollen?

Pollen is the tiny egg-shaped male cells of flowering plants, including trees, grasses, and weeds. Pollen is microscopic in size.

It is the most common cause of seasonal allergic rhinitis, sometimes known as hay fever.

Which plants produce pollen that cause allergic reactions?

Plants that have powdery granules of pollen that are easily blown by the wind, such as:

  • Trees, such as oak, western red cedar, elm, birch, ash, hickory, poplar, sycamore, maple, cypress, walnut, catalpa, olive, and pecan

  • Grasses, such as Timothy, Johnson, Bermuda, orchard, sweet vernal, red top, and some blue grasses

  • Weeds, such as ragweed, sagebrush, pigweed, tumbleweed, Russian thistle, and cockle weed

Most flowering plants, such as roses, have heavier, waxy pollens that are not as easily wind-blown.

When is pollen season?

Each plant has a pollen season. It usually starts in the spring, but may begin as early as January in the southern areas of the U.S. The season usually lasts until November.

Can allergic rhinitis in pollen season be prevented?

To lessen the effects of allergic rhinitis during pollen season, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology suggests the following:

  • Keep windows closed at night and use air conditioning, which cleans, cools, and dries the air.

  • Minimize outdoor activities early in the morning, between 5 and 10 a.m., when pollen is most prevalent.

  • Keep car windows closed when traveling.

  • Take a vacation to an area where pollen is not as prevalent, such as the ocean.

  • Take the medicines prescribed by your healthcare provider.

  • Don't spend much time outdoors when the pollen count is high.

  • Don't rake leaves during pollen season.

  • If you are allergic to grass, wear a mask or have someone else mow the lawn.  

  • Don't hang bedding or clothing outside to dry.

© 2000-2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. 780 Township Line Road, Yardley, PA 19067. All rights reserved. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Always follow your healthcare professional's instructions.

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